TWUDelivering ExcellencePutting People FirstSetting New StandardsImprovingDailyBeing AccountableLOCAL 291

TWU LOCAL 291Delivering ExcellencePutting People FirstSetting New StandardsImproving PerformanceBeing AccountableDaily

Financial Planning Virtual Workshops

This information is being provided on behalf of the Group Benefits Administration, Human Resources Department

 

 

FYI, the Human Resources Department in conjunction with the Florida Retirement System (FRS), is providing virtual financial planning workshops.   These online webinars will be interactive and will require the employee to enroll for the session they are interested in attending.  From March 16, 2021 – March 30, 2021, multiple sessions will be provided on the Pension Plan and the Investment Plan to provide all employees with an understanding of the FRS.  You must pre-register for the webinars via ZOOM to participate (refer to attached flyer to pre-register).

 

 

3/16/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/16/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/18/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/18/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/23/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/23/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/24/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/24/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/25/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/25/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/30/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/30/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

 

 

 

Wear Your Face Mask At All Times

 

Be safe, exercise social distancing, and wash your hands!

 

 

Jennifer Walker, Chief

Human Resources Division

Department of Transportation and Public Works

701 N.W. 1st Court, 13th Floor

Miami, FL  33136

(786) 469-5089 (ofc)

Email:  jjw@miamidade.gov

 

“It may not be our fault, but it is our problem”…DTPW  HR

Financial Planning Virtual Workshops

This information is being provided on behalf of the Group Benefits Administration, Human Resources Department

 

 

FYI, the Human Resources Department in conjunction with the Florida Retirement System (FRS), is providing virtual financial planning workshops.   These online webinars will be interactive and will require the employee to enroll for the session they are interested in attending.  From March 16, 2021 – March 30, 2021, multiple sessions will be provided on the Pension Plan and the Investment Plan to provide all employees with an understanding of the FRS.  You must pre-register for the webinars via ZOOM to participate (refer to attached flyer to pre-register).

 

 

3/16/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/16/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/18/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/18/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/23/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/23/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/24/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/24/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/25/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

3/25/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/30/2021

10:00 AM

Understanding the FRS Investment Plan (IP)

3/30/2021

2:00 PM

Understanding Your Benefits Under the Pension Plan (PP)

 

 

 

Wear Your Face Mask At All Times

 

Be safe, exercise social distancing, and wash your hands!

 

 

Jennifer Walker, Chief

Human Resources Division

Department of Transportation and Public Works

701 N.W. 1st Court, 13th Floor

Miami, FL  33136

(786) 469-5089 (ofc)

Email:  jjw@miamidade.gov

 

“It may not be our fault, but it is our problem”…DTPW  HR

Miami VA is offering COVID-19 vaccination for Veterans
who are ESSENTIAL FRONTLINE WORKERS

Also, if you need assistance with VA Healthcare or other VA Benefits please feel free to contact Maximo I. Alcocer,
Veterans Outreach Program Coordinator
at 305-575-7000 Ext 16034.

 

Wear Your Face Mask At All Times

 

Be safe, exercise social distancing, and wash your hands!

 

 

Jennifer Walker, Chief

Human Resources Division

Department of Transportation and Public Works

701 N.W. 1st Court, 13th Floor

Miami, FL  33136

(786) 469-5089 (ofc)

Email:  jjw@miamidade.gov

 

“It may not be our fault, but it is our problem”…DTPW  HR

Miami VA is offering COVID-19 vaccination for Veterans
who are ESSENTIAL FRONTLINE WORKERS

Also, if you need assistance with VA Healthcare or other VA Benefits please feel free to contact Maximo I. Alcocer,
Veterans Outreach Program Coordinator
at 305-575-7000 Ext 16034.

 

Wear Your Face Mask At All Times

 

Be safe, exercise social distancing, and wash your hands!

 

 

Jennifer Walker, Chief

Human Resources Division

Department of Transportation and Public Works

701 N.W. 1st Court, 13th Floor

Miami, FL  33136

(786) 469-5089 (ofc)

Email:  jjw@miamidade.gov

 

“It may not be our fault, but it is our problem”…DTPW  HR

FL AFL-CIO E-Messenger: Week of 2/12

FL AFL-CIO E-Messenger: Week of 2/12

Good evening and welcome to this edition of the Florida AFL-CIO E-Messenger, your roundup of Labor news across the Sunshine State and the nation. Let’s dive in.

 

Virtual Working Families Lobby Corps: Your (Digital) Voice at the Capitol

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We are less than a month away from the start of Florida's Legislative Session, and the attacks on Florida's working people have already begun in earnest. We have the power to fight back. Every year, citizen activists with the Working Families Lobby Corps make their voices heard and stand up for a better future for Florida's working people.

 

 

This year, Working Families Lobby Corps will be held digitally in order to keep members safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Florida AFL-CIO offices and building will remain closed throughout Legislative Session. Volunteers with the Virtual Working Families Lobby Corps will continue to be involved in Florida's democratic process from the safety of their own homes.

 

Governor DeSantis and his allies in the Legislature are using the COVID-19 pandemic to turbocharge legislation that would dramatically impact Florida's working families. Join us as we fight back! Click here to find out more about getting involved in this year's Virtual Working Families Lobby Corps.

IBEW 824 Continues their Fight for a Fair Contract

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Photo Credit: Kyle Gawroriski

This past Super Bowl Sunday, IBEW 824 in the Tampa Bay area, held a masked and socially distanced, informational picket about their ongoing fight with Frontier Communications for a fair contract.

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Photo Credit: Kyle Gawroriski

Hundreds of members, their families, and allies joined the picket last Sunday, across from Tampa's Raymond James Stadium. The event also included a plane flying a banner to raise awareness of Frontier Communications' unfair treatment of these essential workers. 

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Photo Credit: Kyle Gawroriski

Workers with Frontier have been on the frontlines working to provide internet access for those working from home and children learning virtually. Internet access has been absolutely essential throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Frontier has decided, in the middle of the pandemic, to gut workers' healthcare and eliminate 401(k)s and healthcare benefits for retirees.

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Photo Credit: Kyle Gawroriski

Creative Loafing in Tampa has more on the event, and you can find out more about the contract negotiations at IBEW 824's website here.

Tampa: Join Us in Raising the B.A.R.!

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This Thursday, February 18th, the Tampa City Council will hear an ordinance that would require 12 percent of work hours be set aside for registered apprenticeships on large public work projects. This would be a massive step in the right direction in training the next generation of skilled construction workers and providing good-paying jobs in the city of Tampa.

If you live in the Tampa area, please take a second to lend your voice in support of this ordinance. If you are currently enrolled in a Florida Department of Education registered apprenticeship program or have completed one and would like to share your story in support, please respond to this e-mail.

Pensacola State College Faculty Association to Hold Protest Over Unsafe Conditions February 16th

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Pensacola State College Faculty Association members and their allies will hold a car caravan ahead of the college's Board of Trustees meeting, Tuesday, February 16th at 3:45 P.M. CST.

Members are protesting unsafe working conditions that are putting both faculty and students at risk. If you are interested in joining, you can RSVP on the Facebook event page, located here: https://fb.me/e/20t7K0SNi, or e-mail stayingalivepsc@gmail.com. Solidarity!

Florida News: Florida Legislature Gears Up for a Tumultuous Legislative Session

Florida's Legislative Session is shaping up to be full of challenges for Florida's working people. Leadership in Tallahassee have already shown their plans for this session: an all-out assault on Florida's working families. Anti-worker bills have been fast-tracked to be passed as soon as possible, in the middle of a pandemic and economic collapse.

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Senate Bill 78, Dues and Uniforms Assessments, is a particularly nasty example of this year's slate of legislation that seeks to strip away the rights of working families. Senate Bill 78 is yet another attempt by the Florida Legislature to prevent frontline workers in the public sector from organizing. 

SB 78 is part of a national push by billionaire-funded anti-union think tanks to make the unionization process as heavy-handed as possible to discourage membership. If passed, the bill would put employers in charge of the unionization process, adding more needless red-tape and confusion. It would also prevent employees from automatically renewing their membership with their union and include wording meant to dissuade workers from joining on union authorization forms. The Florida Phoenix has more on SB 78 here.

We've lead the charge against these kinds of union-busting bills in the past, and we're doing it again. Click here to find out more about SB 78 and how to call your senator and tell them to vote no on this piece of legislation. Union busting is disgusting!

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Above: Senator Ray Rodrigues, sponsor of SB 84. Source: Colin Hackley/Florida Politics

Florida's pension system is a huge driver for Florida's economy. Every dollar spent into the system generates $6. The system has an $18 billion dollar impact on our state economy and adds an estimated $2.7 billion dollars in tax revenue.


Unfortunately, the same folks pushing the aforementioned SB 78 are attempting to pass legislation, Senate Bill 84, that would prevent future public sector workers from joining the pension program, forcing them to switch to a 401(k) investment style account. This bill could weaken Florida's pension system and is being rushed without any conclusive studies. Read more about SB 84 at the Tallahassee Democrat.

AFSCME Florida is leading a letter campaign against this legislation, featuring a video from AFSCME Retiree Dave Jacobsen. You can watch the video and find out more here.

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Members of Working Families Lobby Corps protest SB 774 last year. While the bill was defeated, this year's SB 220 looks to continue its dubious legacy.

"If you don't succeed, try again" isn't always a good thing. Case in point, once again, legislation in the Senate is attempting to roll back Florida's best in the nation Sunshine Laws in the process of hiring university & college presidents. Florida's Sunshine Laws provide citizens with some of the most transparent governance in the nation. SB 220 would hide the process of choosing university & college presidents from the general public, running the risk of corruption and cronyism in selecting some of the most powerful unelected figures in the State of Florida.  

 

If this all sounds familiar, that's because it's almost a carbon copy of legislation that (thankfully) failed last year, thanks in part to the work of Florida's Labor Movement. It's enough to make one feel like they're Bill Murray in Groundhog Day argues the Orlando Sentinel Editorial Board.

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Senator Jeff Brandes, sponsor of SJR 854 (and SB 220, along with Senator Rodrigues.) Photo Credit: Florida Phoenix/Colin Hackley

Floridians overwhelmingly supported a constitutional amendment last election that would gradually raise the state minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2026. Disappointingly, a new push in the Florida Senate, SJR 854, seeks to alter the will of the people. If passed, the resolution would put the move to a vote via constitutional amendment.

 

This would place a big asterisk on the $15 minimum wage, allowing businesses to pay "hard-to-hire" workers less. This would primarily affect workers under the age of 21 and returning citizens. The resolution has already caused controversy, and groups across the state are speaking out against it, including advocates for returning citizens. You can read more at the Orlando Sentinel.

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Members of Unite Here 355 call for the state to fix our unemployment system last year. Unfortunately, the system is still failing.

In the meantime, Florida's unemployment system is continuing to fail out of work Floridians. It seems the Legislature has bigger priorities than the thousands of Floridians who are still yet to receive any benefits, or the ones struggling to get by on the meager ones the state does offer. The UK's The Guardian has more on the international laughingstock that is Florida's unemployment system.

 

National News: Organized Labor Mobilizes to Pass the PRO Act, This Year's Super Bowl is Brought to You by America's Unions, Nothing Says "I Love You" Like Union-Made Valentine's Gifts

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The PRO Act, sweeping legislation that presents a path forward for America's working people, is once again up in the United States House of Representatives. Last year, the bill passed the House but was shot down by Mitch McConnell and his allies in the Senate.

America's unions are leading the fight for this crucial legislation. If passed, the bill would put the power to unionize back in the control of America's working people and fight back against years of attacks on our right to organize. You can find out more about the PRO Act and how to call your Representative here.

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This year's Super Bowl, here in the Sunshine State in the author of this e-mail's hometown of Tampa, Florida, was brought to you by America's unions. Sorry to any Chiefs fans reading this. Go Bucs.

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The AFL-CIO is celebrating Black History month by lifting up the stories of labor leaders who have made history and continue to make history every day. You can read today's profile here.

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AFL-CIO President Emeritus John J. Sweeney has passed away. As AFL-CIO President, Sweeney led the Labor Movement into the 21st century through a commitment to organizing and social justice. You can read the AFL-CIO's In Memoriam statement here.

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Reuters/Slate

Workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, are leading a historic push to unionize. Amazon has been notoriously hostile to unions, despite near-constant attacks, workers at the warehouse have begun to vote on organizing. Slate has more on the fight.

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This Valentine's Day, there's no better way to show your love than with high-quality, union-made gifts. You can find out more about union-made in America products here.

 

That wraps up this edition of the Florida AFL-CIO E-Messenger. Stay safe and solidarity!

 

Got any tips, actions, or messages you’d like to see in this email?

Please email Michael Newberger at mnewberger@flaflcio.org.

Why workers need the Protecting the Right to Organize Act:

Why workers need the Protecting the Right to Organize Act:

Fact Sheet | Unions and Labor Standards

How the PRO Act solves the problems in current law that thwart workers seeking union representation

Nearly half (48%) of all nonunion workers surveyed say they would vote for a union if given the opportunity—a roughly 50% higher share than when a similar survey was taken 40 years earlier. And the 65% of Americans who approve of labor unions is higher than it has been since the early 2000s, with young workers ages 18–34 the most supportive. But the share of workers represented by a union was just 12.1% in 2020. If so many workers want union representation, why don’t they have it? The fact is that our current labor law—which is supposed to protect the right of workers in the private sector to organize—actually makes it very difficult for workers to win union representation.Workers face multiple hurdles when they try to organize and employers have too much leeway to interfere with workers’ free choice. Employers have many legal ways to intimidate and coerce workers, and when employers resort to illegal tactics such as firing workers for organizing, they incur no monetary penalties.

[Related: PRO Act at a glance]

The Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act addresses many of the major shortcomings with our current law. Passing the PRO Act would help restore workers’ ability to organize with their co-workers and negotiate for better pay, benefits, and fairness on the job. Passing the PRO Act would also promote greater racial economic justice because unions and collective bargaining help shrink the Black–white wage gap and bring greater fairness to the workplace.

Problems that the PRO Act addresses

The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) is supposed to protect the rights of private-sector workers to organize. But there are serious shortcomings in the current law—and in the operations of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) established to carry out key parts of the law. The weaknesses are exploited by anti-union employers and the union-busting consultants they hire, who intimidate workers seeking to unionize, stall union elections, and erect roadblocks to negotiating union contracts that improve pay and working conditions for workers.

Problem: Employers can fire pro-union workers with no real consequences

In one out of every five union organizing campaigns, employers fire pro-union workers, because employers know this will frighten employees and undermine the organizing campaign. This is illegal under the NLRA, but employers do it anyway. In fact, employers are charged with violating the law by firing activists, making illegal threats, and engaging in other unlawful conduct in 41.5% of all organizing campaigns.

Employers know that under current labor law, they will face no real consequences for illegally firing workers. They just must comply with an order to rehire the worker and pay the back wages the worker would have earned anyhow, minus the wages the worker earned, or could have earned, in the interim. In other words, firing union supporters is just a cost of doing business. The law does not provide for monetary penalties against employers for illegally firing pro-union workers, or for damages to be awarded to employees for the hardships they face when they are fired illegally. Workers have no right to bring a civil lawsuit against their employer challenging their illegal discharge—for any recourse they must depend on the NLRB to pursue their case.

The lack of real remedies and recourse affects thousands of workers. In fiscal year 2019, employers were ordered to reinstate more than 1,431 workers who were fired illegally for exercising their rights.

PRO Act solution: The PRO Act establishes civil penalties for employers who violate workers’ rights as well as individual liability for corporate officials. The PRO Act authorizes the award of monetary damages to workers who are illegally fired or suffer other serious economic harm. The legislation directs the NLRB to seek federal court injunctions to get illegally fired workers back in their jobs while their retaliation cases are pending. And it creates a private right of action so that illegally discharged workers can file civil lawsuits against their employers and are not wholly dependent on the NLRB to pursue their cases.

Problem: Employers interfere with the election process

When workers try to form a union with their co-workers, they collect petitions, cards, or other statements of support from workers in a chosen group (the “bargaining unit”), showing that workers want a union. Often workers will ask their employer to voluntarily recognize and bargain with their union once they have cards or other written support from a majority of employees in the bargaining unit. This method of forming a union— known as majority sign-up or card check recognition—has existed since even before the passage of the original NLRA in 1935. Thousands of employers have respected their workers’ choice and have recognized and bargained with unions after voluntary recognition.

But under current law, employers are not required to recognize and bargain with a union that is supported by a majority of workers. Instead, employers can refuse to recognize a union and require workers to go through the NLRB’s election process—a process that employers exploit to delay and undermine the union organizing drive.

Problem: Employers stall the election to buy time to campaign against the union

If an employer refuses to voluntarily recognize a union that has the support of a majority of employees, employees must file a petition for a representation election with the NLRB. The NLRB investigates the petition and schedules an election. Employers exploit the law to drag out the scheduling of the election, and they then use the time between the petition and the election to campaign against the union.

One of the tactics frequently used by employers to delay the election is to challenge the makeup of the bargaining unit—the group that is voting on union representation. Employers argue that certain employees’ jobs are different, that more workers should be included, or that certain employees are supervisors. The election process is delayed while hearings are scheduled and held on the employer’s arguments, even when the arguments affect only a small percentage of voters.

During the Obama Administration, the NLRB tried to streamline the election process, limit the ability of employers to challenge workers’ proposed bargaining units, and reduce litigation and delay caused by these employer tactics. But the Trump NLRB reversed many of these changes, and the time between an election petition and an election increased as a result.

PRO Act solution: The PRO Act addresses employer delay tactics by restoring the Obama-era changes to the representation election process and making clear that the decision over the proper bargaining unit is to be made by workers and the NLRB, not manipulated by employers.

Problem: Lopsided communications controlled by employers means workers hear only anti-union messages

Employers use their access to workers and control of the workplace to make sure workers understand the employer’s views about unionization. Anti-union messages are included in orientation materials for new employees, and employers use company email to broadcast anti-union messages. Nine in 10 employers require employees to attend mandatory captive-audience meetings—meetings delivering anti-union messages that employees must attend or else be disciplined or fired. Two-thirds of employers require employees to meet one-on-one with their supervisors at least weekly during organizing campaigns. Meanwhile, employers legally are allowed to keep union organizers out of the workplace so that organizers are unable to talk directly with employees on the job. The Trump NLRB gave employers even more power to exclude organizers and off-duty employees from their property. As a result, under current law, workers are bombarded by the employer’s message and deprived of the ability to hear from the union at their workplace.

PRO Act solution: The PRO Act bans captive audience meetings so workers will no longer be coerced into hearing their employer’s anti-union messages. It requires employers to allow workers to use company email systems for organizing purposes unless there are compelling business reasons for disallowing this use.

Problem: Employers hire union-busters to push back on workers’ power

Instead of leaving the decision of whether to form a union to their employees and respecting their choice, employers regularly hire third-party anti-union consultants, who craft and carry out communications and campaign plans to discourage workers from forming unions. Three out of every four employers hire third-party union-busters to help them with their campaigns, sometimes spending hundreds of thousands of dollars, or more. Employers overall spend at least $340 million each year on anti-union consultants. Workers often are kept in the dark about who their employer is hiring and how much money the employer is spending on third-party union-busters. Public reports disclosing activities and expenditures are only filed months after the activity takes place, if then. A huge legal loophole allows employers and union-busters to avoid reporting completely if the union-buster stays in the background and avoids direct contact with workers.

PRO Act solution: The PRO Act requires prompt disclosure of union-busting activities and closes the loophole through which employers and consultants have evaded reporting.

Problem: Employers stall progress toward initial collective bargaining agreements

When workers make it through the NLRB election labyrinth and vote to form a union, employers drag their feet in bargaining over a collective agreement. More than half of all workers who vote to form a union still are without a collective bargaining agreement a year later. Two years after an election, 37% of newly formed private-sector unions still have no labor agreement.

Too often, employers slow-walk the bargaining process and fail to bargain in good faith, and the law is too weak to deter this conduct. In other cases, employers take advantage of current law, which allows them to refuse to bargain if they are challenging an issue related to the original election, like the composition of the bargaining unit. This process can take years, and in the meantime, the workers’ decision to form a union is thwarted. This creates a discouraging situation for workers and allows employers to foster a sense of futility in the process.

PRO Act solution: The PRO Act establishes a mediation and, if necessary, arbitration process to ensure that workers and employers obtain an initial collective bargaining agreement when workers first organize. The act requires employers to bargain in good faith when a new union is recognized or certified so that employers cannot stall the bargaining process over legal technicalities.


An EPI chart listing some of the major problems in current labor law and how the PRO Act addresses them can be found here.


Feb 16th Protect The Wage Event Resources

Subject: Feb 16th PROTECT THE WAGE EVENT RESOURCES

Good afternoon everyone, I hope this day is a good start to your week. We're almost finished with our packet of research, graphics and messaging around opposing SJR 854. I'll make sure to forward that right away as soon as it's ready.
In the meantime, below are RSVP links and flyers for our caravans next Tuesday. I would appreciate any turnout and spokespeople you could provide, especially ex-felons and persons under 21 years of age. We want to have a strong representation of perspectives in attendance.


Also, please let me know if you would like to be listed as a co-sponsor on the Facebook events.

Best Wishes,
Kofi Hunt
Political Director with SEIU National Fast Food Workers Union - Florida
727-643-5435

Feb 16th PROTECT THE WAGE EVENT RESOURCES

Subject: Feb 16th PROTECT THE WAGE EVENT RESOURCES


Good afternoon everyone, I hope this day is a good start to your week. We're almost finished with our packet of research, graphics and messaging around opposing SJR 854. I'll make sure to forward that right away as soon as it's ready.
In the meantime, below are RSVP links and flyers for our caravans next Tuesday. I would appreciate any turnout and spokespeople you could provide, especially ex-felons and persons under 21 years of age. We want to have a strong representation of perspectives in attendance.


Also, please let me know if you would like to be listed as a co-sponsor on the Facebook events.

Best Wishes,
Kofi Hunt
Political Director with SEIU National Fast Food Workers Union - Florida
727-643-5435
Feb 16th PROTECT THE WAGE EVENT RESOURCES
Feb 16th PROTECT THE WAGE EVENT RESOURCES
Feb 16th PROTECT THE WAGE EVENT RESOURCES

Iraida Mujica Is Tough As Nails


Transport Track Repair - TWU Local 291

Iraida Mujica

Iraida Mujica

Job: Transport Track Repair
Age: 43
Hometown: Miramar, Florida

What do you do? 
I am a track repairer who works on full maintenance of the tracks of Miami-Dade Transit. 

What is a typical day like for you? 
At work from 6 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and complete work orders that are open based on track maintenance. After that I go home, get ready to head out to the gym for about two hours and then go home around 6:30-7 p.m. to attend to my family. I work longer hours on Saturdays and Sundays. 

What makes you tough as nails? 
My endurance, mental toughness, never-give-up attitude, positive personality, hunger, drive, and fearlessness. 

Read Iraida's full bio.

Iraida Mujica Is Tough As Nails


Transport Track Repair - TWU Local 291

Iraida Mujica

Iraida Mujica

Job: Transport Track Repair
Age: 43
Hometown: Miramar, Florida

What do you do? 
I am a track repairer who works on full maintenance of the tracks of Miami-Dade Transit. 

What is a typical day like for you? 
At work from 6 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and complete work orders that are open based on track maintenance. After that I go home, get ready to head out to the gym for about two hours and then go home around 6:30-7 p.m. to attend to my family. I work longer hours on Saturdays and Sundays. 

What makes you tough as nails? 
My endurance, mental toughness, never-give-up attitude, positive personality, hunger, drive, and fearlessness. 

Read Iraida's full bio.

TWU VETERANS


WE NEED YOUR PICTURES & SELFIES!

TWU VETERANS


WE NEED YOUR PICTURES & SELFIES!

TWU VETERANS - WE NEED YOUR PICTURES & SELFIES!

At 65%, Approval of Labor Unions in U.S. Remains High


Politics - September 3, 2020

Story Highlights

  • 65% of Americans approve of labor unions
  • Latest reading is highest since 2003
  • Democrats' approval is 83%, Republicans' 45%; independents' is 64%
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- As Labor Day approaches and economic conditions in the U.S. remain tenuous, Americans' 65% approval of labor unions is once again the highest it has been since 2003. Public support for labor unions has been generally rising since hitting its lowest point of 48% in 2009, during the Great Recession.

Gallup's initial reading of the public's support for labor unions was 72% in 1936, at the advent of the modern U.S. organized labor movement, and approval peaked at 75% in 1953 and 1957. The lowest ratings to date have been recorded during particularly weak economic times. This includes the late 1970s and early to mid-1980s -- when support fell below 60% for the first time -- and 2009 through 2012, when it hovered around 50%.

While the latest reading, from a July 30-Aug. 12 poll, comes at a time of severe economic upheaval, this has so far not had a negative impact on the public's view of unions, as it is little changed from last year's reading.

Americans' support for unions is politically polarized, as it has been since 2001, when Gallup began tracking the measure annually. Democrats' current 83% approval of labor unions is the highest on record since then. At the same time, 45% of Republicans and 64% of independents approve of unions.

In 2009, 66% of Democrats, 29% of Republicans and 44% of independents viewed labor unions favorably. Since the Great Recession, union approval has recovered among all three major party groups.

Membership in Labor Unions Remains Steady

Americans' reported membership in a labor union remains similar to recent years, with 10% saying they are a union member. Overall, 16% say there is a union member in their household.

At 65%, Approval of Labor Unions in U.S. Remains High

Implications

Americans' approval of labor unions has been consistently high for several years and has more than recovered from low points around the Great Recession. Even as the U.S. grapples with the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic crisis, which includes record-high unemployment, support for unions remains strong.

Previous Gallup data have found that while Americans largely think unions help their own workers, they are less inclined to say they are helpful to the U.S. economy overall. As such, support for unions has been weaker during challenging economic times.

Americans' continued high approval of unions may result from a current focus on issues other than the economy. Generally, when economic indicators have been negative, the economy has been viewed as the most important problem facing the nation, but that is not the case now. The public is divided in its assessments of the biggest U.S. problem, with roughly one in five each citing the coronavirus, the economy, race relations and leadership. Yet, if the economy continues to struggle and it eclipses other issues in importance, Americans' views of unions could very well worsen.

View complete question responses and trends (PDF download).

Learn more about how the Gallup Poll Social Series works.

At 65%, Approval of Labor Unions in U.S. Remains High


Politics - September 3, 2020

Story Highlights

  • 65% of Americans approve of labor unions
  • Latest reading is highest since 2003
  • Democrats' approval is 83%, Republicans' 45%; independents' is 64%
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- As Labor Day approaches and economic conditions in the U.S. remain tenuous, Americans' 65% approval of labor unions is once again the highest it has been since 2003. Public support for labor unions has been generally rising since hitting its lowest point of 48% in 2009, during the Great Recession.

Gallup's initial reading of the public's support for labor unions was 72% in 1936, at the advent of the modern U.S. organized labor movement, and approval peaked at 75% in 1953 and 1957. The lowest ratings to date have been recorded during particularly weak economic times. This includes the late 1970s and early to mid-1980s -- when support fell below 60% for the first time -- and 2009 through 2012, when it hovered around 50%.

While the latest reading, from a July 30-Aug. 12 poll, comes at a time of severe economic upheaval, this has so far not had a negative impact on the public's view of unions, as it is little changed from last year's reading.

Americans' support for unions is politically polarized, as it has been since 2001, when Gallup began tracking the measure annually. Democrats' current 83% approval of labor unions is the highest on record since then. At the same time, 45% of Republicans and 64% of independents approve of unions.

In 2009, 66% of Democrats, 29% of Republicans and 44% of independents viewed labor unions favorably. Since the Great Recession, union approval has recovered among all three major party groups.

Membership in Labor Unions Remains Steady

Americans' reported membership in a labor union remains similar to recent years, with 10% saying they are a union member. Overall, 16% say there is a union member in their household.

Americans' Labor Union Membership
Are you, or is anyone in your household, a member of a labor union?
Yes, respondent in labor union 7
Yes, other household member in labor union 6
Both respondent and other household member in labor union 3
Not a member of labor union 83
Net: Union household 16
GALLUP, July 30-Aug. 12, 2020

Implications

Americans' approval of labor unions has been consistently high for several years and has more than recovered from low points around the Great Recession. Even as the U.S. grapples with the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting economic crisis, which includes record-high unemployment, support for unions remains strong.

Previous Gallup data have found that while Americans largely think unions help their own workers, they are less inclined to say they are helpful to the U.S. economy overall. As such, support for unions has been weaker during challenging economic times.

Americans' continued high approval of unions may result from a current focus on issues other than the economy. Generally, when economic indicators have been negative, the economy has been viewed as the most important problem facing the nation, but that is not the case now. The public is divided in its assessments of the biggest U.S. problem, with roughly one in five each citing the coronavirus, the economy, race relations and leadership. Yet, if the economy continues to struggle and it eclipses other issues in importance, Americans' views of unions could very well worsen.

View complete question responses and trends (PDF download).

Learn more about how the Gallup Poll Social Series works.

This afternoon, the Florida Senate Judiciary Committee will vote on SB 78, legislation that attacks teachers, firefighters, healthcare professionals, and all other public front line workers' right to join a union. Click here to call your senator and tell them to vote no on SB 78!
http://bit.ly/FindYourSenatorFL Reply STOP to quit, HELP for info. Msg&DataRatesMayApply

Union Busting Is Disgusting


Stop SB 78

Union Busting Is Disgusting


Stop SB 78

Florida’s Legislative Session is just weeks away, and once again, some in the Florida Senate are already pushing legislation that would infringe on our right to unionize.

This Wednesday, the Senate Governmental Oversight and Accountability Committee will hear Senate Bill 78, a union-busting bill supported by corporate-backed “think tanks” and part of a nationwide push to make the unionization process as complicated as possible in order to discourage workers from organizing. SB 78 would make the unionization process needlessly cumbersome and heavy-handed for Florida’s public sector workers.  

Here in Florida, the decision to join a union is yours and yours alone. If passed, SB 78 would add needless red tape to the process of joining a union and require members to reauthorize their membership, as opposed to automatically renewing their membership.

On top of bogging down the membership process, SB 78 would put the responsibility of confirming union dues on the employer, adding even more unnecessary headaches. Public sector workers have been on the frontlines of this pandemic, putting themselves at risk to keep our communities running. Our teachers, law enforcement professionals, firefighters, and state workers deserve better.

Click here to find your state senator and tell them to vote no on SB 78!

 

Florida’s Legislative Session is just weeks away, and once again, some in the Florida Senate are already pushing legislation that would infringe on our right to unionize.

This Wednesday, the Senate Governmental Oversight and Accountability Committee will hear Senate Bill 78, a union-busting bill supported by corporate-backed “think tanks” and part of a nationwide push to make the unionization process as complicated as possible in order to discourage workers from organizing. SB 78 would make the unionization process needlessly cumbersome and heavy-handed for Florida’s public sector workers.  

Here in Florida, the decision to join a union is yours and yours alone. If passed, SB 78 would add needless red tape to the process of joining a union and require members to reauthorize their membership, as opposed to automatically renewing their membership.

On top of bogging down the membership process, SB 78 would put the responsibility of confirming union dues on the employer, adding even more unnecessary headaches. Public sector workers have been on the frontlines of this pandemic, putting themselves at risk to keep our communities running. Our teachers, law enforcement professionals, firefighters, and state workers deserve better.

Click here to find your state senator and tell them to vote no on SB 78!

 

2021 Michael J. Quill Scholarship Program


Now Accepting Applications

2021 Michael J. Quill Scholarship Program


Now Accepting Applications

2021 Michael J Quill Scholarship Program
2021 Michael J Quill Scholarship Program

COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Toolkit for Essential Workers


Getting Started | CDC

COVID-19 Vaccine Communication Toolkit for Essential Workers


Getting Started | CDC

woman wearing mask giving a thumbs up with text I got my COVID-19 Vaccine! You are essential. Getting a COVID_!( vaccine adds one more layer of protection. www.cdc.gov

In some states, essential workers already have access to vaccines to help protect them against COVID-19. These vaccines will be available to essential workers across the nation soon. CDC has provided a toolkit to help employers educate their essential workers about this important new prevention tool.

Who is this toolkit for?

This toolkit is designed for employers of essential workers. Essential workers perform duties across critical infrastructure sectors and maintain the services and functions that U.S. residents depend on daily. Examples of the many types of essential workers include police officers, firefighters, and people working in education, child care centers, and grocery stores.

What is the purpose of this toolkit?

This toolkit will help your organization educate employees about COVID-19 vaccines, raise awareness about the benefits of vaccination, and address common questions and concerns.

What is in the toolkit?

The toolkit contains a variety of resources that you can use virtually or in person (with proper COVID-19 safety precautions):

woman wearing mask giving a thumbs up with text I got my COVID-19 Vaccine! You are essential. Getting a COVID_!( vaccine adds one more layer of protection. www.cdc.gov

In some states, essential workers already have access to vaccines to help protect them against COVID-19. These vaccines will be available to essential workers across the nation soon. CDC has provided a toolkit to help employers educate their essential workers about this important new prevention tool.

Who is this toolkit for?

This toolkit is designed for employers of essential workers. Essential workers perform duties across critical infrastructure sectors and maintain the services and functions that U.S. residents depend on daily. Examples of the many types of essential workers include police officers, firefighters, and people working in education, child care centers, and grocery stores.

What is the purpose of this toolkit?

This toolkit will help your organization educate employees about COVID-19 vaccines, raise awareness about the benefits of vaccination, and address common questions and concerns.

What is in the toolkit?

The toolkit contains a variety of resources that you can use virtually or in person (with proper COVID-19 safety precautions):

Posters/flyers

These posters/flyers encourage and support community members in their decision to get vaccinated. You can print and post them in your buildings and other community locations.

Social Media

These messages and images are for use on various social media channels that your organization uses, including Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. You can use them as-is with the hashtag #SleeveUp or include your own identity.

Sample Social Media Message

Social Media Graphics

How can I get started?

  • Adapt the key messages to the language, tone, and format that will resonate with your organization. You know what works for your employees.
  • Use these key messages to customize the template letter and send or email it to your employees to introduce your COVID-19 vaccine educational activities.
  • Print copies of the posters and FAQs and use them as handouts.
  • Organize a COVID-19 vaccine presentation for your employees and promote it via digital and employee communication channels. If you are able, organize a virtual presentation. If not, organize an in-person presentation following COVID-19 safety precautions. Ask if your local health department can provide a speaker if you do not have a health educator on staff. Distribute copies of the FAQs.
  • Hang posters in highly visible places in your offices, buildings, and other employee locations.
  • Continue to educate your workforce via articles, blog posts, and social media posts.
  • Invite your employees to wear stickers once they have been vaccinated and post vaccination selfies on social media.

If you are not already working with your local health department, consider reaching out for assistance. The health department’s immunization program can help coordinate vaccination clinics, provide speakers for presentations, and offer other types of expertise.

Can I put my organization’s logo on these materials?

  • You can put your organization’s logo on materials that have a “Your Logo Here” square, but you should leave the CDC URL (www.cdc.gov) on those materials.

Will this toolkit be expanded?

Yes, CDC will continue to add more materials to this toolkit. Please check back frequently for updates.

What's New for County Employees: 01.04.2021

What's New for County Employees: 01.04.2021

What's New Banner

January 4, 2021

 

Message from the Mayor

I hope you all had a very happy, healthy holiday. As we begin the New Year, we are finally turning the page in this pandemic as we begin distributing vaccines to healthcare workers, firefighters and our vulnerable 65+ residents. I'm grateful to serve alongside each of you as we move our community forward through this crisis and toward a brighter, safer year ahead. Please take our short survey about the vaccine, which the County is now providing to employees 65+. - Mayor Daniella 

 

 

Hot Deals

Florida Mobile MammographyAdobe Acrobat Logo: SPCC, Jan. 6

AAA Auto InsuranceAdobe Acrobat Logo: Save 20 percent on membership

Eyeglasses.com: Save on eyeglasses w/ code MIAMIDADE15

Aflac: Income protection insurance

DCFCU: Apply for a HELOC equity loan

Frontline Heroes ScholarshipAdobe Acrobat Logo: Save 50 percent until March 31

 

 

 

 

Come on, get happy by participating in the Happiness Challenge. Bring a smile to your face as you complete 20 of 30 happiness challenges. Earn 25 WellnessWorks points once you complete the attestation form on Healthyroads. Completing the form also makes you eligible for a chance to win on the WellnessWorks Prize Wheel during a live online drawing. Learn more about the drawing and WellnessWorks' programs and perks.

 

 

 

Miami-Dade County is coordinating closely with hospital and healthcare partners, the Florida Department of Health, municipalities, and private partners to vaccinate healthcare workers and seniors 65+ against COVID-19, following state guidelines. Visit miamidade.gov/vaccine to get the latest updates about where vaccines are available.

 

 

 

Employees in the TWU Local 291 bargaining unit must transfer their medication prescription refills to one of the CVS Maintenance Choice pharmacies: CVS Mail Order, CVS, Target or Navarro. To transfer prescriptions, log in to the AvMed member portal and select the Caremark link under Benefits or call 800-682-8633. 

 

 

 

If you celebrated the holidays with loved ones outside of your household, do your part and help keep our County safe by getting tested for COVID-19. Testing in Miami-Dade is free and widely available. Locate a site near you and make an appointment online.

 

 

 

Deering Estate, in collaboration with the South Florida Region of the Antique Automotive Club of America, will host the 8th Annual Vintage Auto Show on Jan. 10. Guests can enjoy a relaxing day outside with a variety of vintage cars displayed on the historic grounds of the Deering Estate. Tickets can only be purchased online and are required for all guests, including Deering Estate members, as capacity will be limited.

 

 

 

Adopt Pebbles, an awesome 10-year-old female American bulldog with plenty of love to give. Meet her at the Pet Adoption and Protection Center. Or start the new year with Toulouse, a sweet and gentle 3-month-old kitten, who is a graduate of the Kitten Cuddlers foster program. Meet Toulouse at The Cat's Meow Café

 

 

 

Submissions Welcome!

Want to share an event or news item with County employees? 
Complete the What's New form to make your submission. The deadline to appear in next week's issue is Tuesday, January 5 at 5 p.m.

Every submission per issue requires a separate ticket.

You can also read the What's New archives for past issues and find story corrections.

 

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Copyright © 2020 Miami-Dade County. All rights reserved.

whats-new-for-county-employees.jpg
we-can-adopt.jpg
I hope you all had a very happy, healthy holiday. As we begin the New Year, we are finally turning the page in this pandemic as we begin distributing vaccines to healthcare workers, firefighters and our vulnerable 65+ residents. I'm grateful to serve alongside each of you as we move our community forward through this crisis and toward a brighter, safer year ahead. Please take our short survey about the vaccine, which the County is now providing to employees 65+. - Mayor Daniella 
unnamed12.jpg

Florida Mobile MammographyAdobe Acrobat Logo: SPCC, Jan. 6

AAA Auto InsuranceAdobe Acrobat Logo: Save 20 percent on membership

Eyeglasses.com: Save on eyeglasses w/ code MIAMIDADE15

Aflac: Income protection insurance

DCFCU: Apply for a HELOC equity loan

Frontline Heroes ScholarshipAdobe Acrobat Logo: Save 50 percent until March 31

Come on, get happy by participating in the Happiness Challenge. Bring a smile to your face as you complete 20 of 30 happiness challenges. Earn 25 WellnessWorks points once you complete the attestation form on Healthyroads. Completing the form also makes you eligible for a chance to win on the WellnessWorks Prize Wheel during a live online drawing. Learn more about the drawing and WellnessWorks' programs and perks.
Miami-Dade County is coordinating closely with hospital and healthcare partners, the Florida Department of Health, municipalities, and private partners to vaccinate healthcare workers and seniors 65+ against COVID-19, following state guidelines. Visit miamidade.gov/vaccine to get the latest updates about where vaccines are available.
Employees in the TWU Local 291 bargaining unit must transfer their medication prescription refills to one of the CVS Maintenance Choice pharmacies: CVS Mail Order, CVS, Target or Navarro. To transfer prescriptions, log in to the AvMed member portal and select the Caremark link under Benefits or call 800-682-8633. 
If you celebrated the holidays with loved ones outside of your household, do your part and help keep our County safe by getting tested for COVID-19. Testing in Miami-Dade is free and widely available. Locate a site near you and make an appointment online.

Submissions Welcome!

Want to share an event or news item with County employees? 
Complete the What's New form to make your submission. The deadline to appear in next week's issue is Tuesday, January 5 at 5 p.m.

Every submission per issue requires a separate ticket.

You can also read the What's New archives for past issues and find story corrections.

Corona Virus Update
12-22-2020

Corona Virus Update 12-22-2020

The TWU Fought Hard for Stimulus Bill, Encouraged by Results

The TWU Fought Hard for Stimulus Bill, Encouraged by Results

Image

Dear Jeffery,

 

The TWU has spent the past few months working diligently to ensure today’s stimulus bill was passed. The International has been lobbying the Congress ever since March on direct aid to our sectors to ensure that our members are kept on payrolls. This work culminated in five relief and aid bills totaling nearly $4 trillion in spending. Including tens of billions for our rail, train, airline, and services sectors. This money also included unprecedented labor protections never seen before.

 

Even though the stimulus does not include all the funding we requested to assist our members across all divisions who have been working the front lines of this raging pandemic, it will provide much needed relief.

 

The bipartisan legislation contains about $900 billion in relief for pandemic, including $15 billion for airlines through the payroll support program, $14 billion for transit funding, $1 billion for Amtrak, and $2 billion for school buses and other neglected modes of transportation. All this funding comes with unprecedented, strong, labor protections which ensures that workers are the primary beneficiaries of federal support.

 

“The TWU fought for and won jobs for our members. Nearly every TWU member will either stay at work or be recalled from furlough thanks to this legislation. We didn’t just win money, we won stability for our members at work with this deal,” said International President John Samuelsen.

“Our members have been on the frontlines of fighting the coronavirus and this deal recognizes their sacrifices. We needed more funding to keep our transportation system moving and this bill is going to make that happen,” said International Executive Vice President Alex Garcia.

“This is a bill for essential workers. We worked with Democrats, Republicans, and everyone in between to make sure that TWU members can provide for their families and we won,” said International Secretary-Treasurer Jerome Lafragola. 

 

Our members have endured tragic losses, have sacrificed and suffered. Now there appears to be some light at the end of the tunnel. I am happy and thankful that our members will have the funding and protections needed to ensure they are able to continue to support their families and perform their essential duties," said International Administrative Vice President Curtis Tate.

 

“TWU has been leading this fight since June. Congress works slow and we’ll need to be back at it again next year, but this gives our members the money and protections we need to start delivering the covid-19 vaccine in the coming months,” said International Administrative Vice President Mike Mayes. 

TWU LOCAL 291 is Union Strong

TWU Endorses Danielle Cohen Higgins for Miami-Dade County Commission February 6, 2020

Danielle Cohen Higgins knows what it means to work hard and fight for a better future.

Danielle Cohen Higgins for Miami-Dade County Commissioner

Danielle Cohen Higgins knows what it means to work hard and fight for a better future. Born at Jackson Memorial Hospital after her family immigrated from Jamaica to Miami, Danielle began her life in South Dade living in what is now a Section 8 Housing Complex named Milton Manors. She lost her father at the age of 8, and was raised by a single mother who takes the Metro Mover and Metro Rail to work every day.

Despite these obstacles, Danielle fought on. She studied hard and graduated Sunset Senior High School in the top 2% of her class. After receiving a scholarship to the University of Florida, Danielle would become the first person in her family to graduate from college. In 2006, she would earn her Juris Doctorate from the Florida State University School of Law and was admitted as an attorney at the age of 24. She is married to the love of her life, Mark, whose support is unwavering. She has one charming and brilliant son, Ari and a new beautiful baby girl named Sloan.

About Us

Membership and Affiliations
TWU is affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) and the worldwide International Transport Workers Federation (ITF).

All TWU members belong to Locals formed on the basis of interest and geographic location. The members elect their own Local officers who handle most of their problems. The International Union coordinates the activities of the Divisions and the Locals and assists in negotiations, organizing drives and legislative campaigns. It provides professional legal, education, research and public relations services to the Locals and Divisions.

The supreme policy-making body of the union is the International Convention which is held every four years. International officers are elected at the Convention.

TWU History
TWU International

Notice of Variances and Waivers

Miami transit workers call facility ‘Little Wuhan,' ...

What Transit Maintenance Workers Need to Know About COVID-19

Miami transit workers call facility ‘Little Wuhan'...


"Bravo does not really care about the employees. We had to sue two months ago to get protective equipment like masks. Even now they’re not doing enough.”

Workers at Miami’s largest public transit facility have given the William Lehman Center a grim nickname: “Little Wuhan.”. The Florida city is now the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, with Miami-Dade County recording more than 80,000 cases of COVID-19 and at least 1,270 deaths. Many of the 4,000 workers at...

Read More

What Transit Maintenance Workers Need to Know About COVID-19

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by a virus called SARS-CoV-2. Symptoms often include a fever, cough or shortness of breath. Our understanding of how the virus spreads is evolving as we learn more about it, so check the CDC website for the latest information. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

Recent studies indicate that the virus can be spread by people before they develop symptoms (pre-symptomatic) or who never develop symptoms (asymptomatic). It also may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19.

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. Cloth face coverings may prevent people who don’t know they have the virus from transmitting it to others. These face coverings are not surgical masks or respirators and are not appropriate substitutes for them in workplaces where masks or respirators are recommended or required.

As a transit maintenance worker, how can I protect myself?

For transit maintenance workers, potential sources of exposure include close contact with a coworker with COVID-19, contacting surfaces touched or handled by a person with COVID-19, or by touching your mouth, nose, or eyes.

  • Limit close contact with others by maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet, when possible.
  • Avoid touching surfaces often touched by transit passengers.
  • Practice routine cleaning and disinfection of frequently touched surfaces following the directions on the cleaning product’s label.
  • Proper hand hygiene is an important infection control measure. Wash your hands regularly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  • Key times to clean hands in general include:
    • Before, during, and after preparing food
    • Before eating food
    • After using the toilet
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

    Read More

Miami transit workers call facility ‘Little Wuhan,' fear bosses did not take COVID warnings from NYC

Miami transit workers call facility ‘Little Wuhan,' fear bosses did not take COVID warnings from NYC

"Bravo does not really care about the employees. We had to sue two months ago to get protective equipment like masks. Even now they’re not doing enough.”

Workers at Miami’s largest public transit facility have given the William Lehman Center a grim nickname: “Little Wuhan.”. The Florida city is now the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, with Miami-Dade County recording more than 80,000 cases of COVID-19 and at least 1,270 deaths. Many of the 4,000 workers at...

Read More

What Transit Maintenance Workers Need to Know About COVID-19

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness caused by a virus called SARS-CoV-2. Symptoms often include a fever, cough or shortness of breath. Our understanding of how the virus spreads is evolving as we learn more about it, so check the CDC website for the latest information. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person:

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
  • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks.

Recent studies indicate that the virus can be spread by people before they develop symptoms (pre-symptomatic) or who never develop symptoms (asymptomatic). It also may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes. However, this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19.

CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, especially in areas of significant community-based transmission. Cloth face coverings may prevent people who don’t know they have the virus from transmitting it to others. These face coverings are not surgical masks or respirators and are not appropriate substitutes for them in workplaces where masks or respirators are recommended or required.

As a transit maintenance worker, how can I protect myself?

For transit maintenance workers, potential sources of exposure include close contact with a coworker with COVID-19, contacting surfaces touched or handled by a person with COVID-19, or by touching your mouth, nose, or eyes.

  • Limit close contact with others by maintaining a distance of at least 6 feet, when possible.
  • Avoid touching surfaces often touched by transit passengers.
  • Practice routine cleaning and disinfection of frequently touched surfaces following the directions on the cleaning product’s label.
  • Proper hand hygiene is an important infection control measure. Wash your hands regularly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.
  • Key times to clean hands in general include:
    • Before, during, and after preparing food
    • Before eating food
    • After using the toilet
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing

    Read More

Get To Know The Real Commissioner Eileen Higgins

Get To Know The Real Commissioner Eileen Higgins

She Wants To Spend Billions On Chinese Backed Monorail

She thinks it’s okay to attack home-grown Miami families...

She Wants To Spend Billions On Chinese Backed Monorail

She thinks it’s okay to attack home-grown Miami families...

Monorail Project Faces New Hurdles After County Ethics Report

Monorail Project Faces New Hurdles After County Ethics Report

United Teachers of Dade started this petition to Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez and  While positive COVID-19 cases are increasing in our community daily and disparately affecting minority communities nationwide, Mayor Carlos Gimenez is moving towards opening Head Start programs throughout Miami-Dade County and exposing our youngest—possibly most vulnerable—students and families to harm.

Tuesday, the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners could take a second look at a massive transit plan crossing from the City of Miami to Miami Beach

It’s a controversy that’s dragged on for two years. Now, ethics investigators file their report on a meeting in Asia, much of it shielded from public view. NBC 6 Investigative Reporter Phil Prazan takes a look at how this could scrap a $700 million transit plan in the county.

The $770 million plan known as “Baylink” faces another hurdle - this one of transparency and public trust - after a county ethics report, stern words from the county’s inspector general, and a call to scrap the plan by the Commissioner representing Miami Beach.

In May, the Board approved Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s administration to review the plan and begin low-level negotiations with a business group based on a proposal by the Miami Beach Monorail Consortium, a group led by infrastructure developer Meridiam, an Asian casino-entertainment developer Genting Group, and Aqualand Development. Genting and Aqualand are minority partners.

Genting Group owns the former-Miami Herald location along Biscayne Bay in the hopes to develop the land and have it be the launching station for the Baylink transit project.


 

United Teachers of Dade started this petition to Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez and  While positive COVID-19 cases are increasing in our community daily and disparately affecting minority communities nationwide, Mayor Carlos Gimenez is moving towards opening Head Start programs throughout Miami-Dade County and exposing our youngest—possibly most vulnerable—students and families to harm.

Tuesday, the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners could take a second look at a massive transit plan crossing from the City of Miami to Miami Beach

It’s a controversy that’s dragged on for two years. Now, ethics investigators file their report on a meeting in Asia, much of it shielded from public view. NBC 6 Investigative Reporter Phil Prazan takes a look at how this could scrap a $700 million transit plan in the county.

The $770 million plan known as “Baylink” faces another hurdle - this one of transparency and public trust - after a county ethics report, stern words from the county’s inspector general, and a call to scrap the plan by the Commissioner representing Miami Beach.

In May, the Board approved Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s administration to review the plan and begin low-level negotiations with a business group based on a proposal by the Miami Beach Monorail Consortium, a group led by infrastructure developer Meridiam, an Asian casino-entertainment developer Genting Group, and Aqualand Development. Genting and Aqualand are minority partners.

Genting Group owns the former-Miami Herald location along Biscayne Bay in the hopes to develop the land and have it be the launching station for the Baylink transit project.


 

Say NO to Miami-Dade Mayor Gimenez’s #Tuskegee2020 Experiment

Say NO to Miami-Dade Mayor Gimenez’s #Tuskegee2020 Experiment

United Teachers of Dade started this petition to Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez and  While positive COVID-19 cases are increasing in our community daily and disparately affecting minority communities nationwide, Mayor Carlos Gimenez is moving towards opening Head Start programs throughout Miami-Dade County and exposing our youngest—possibly most vulnerable—students and families to harm.
Tell Mayor Carlos Gimenez to put a stop to this madness while we can still protect the lives and safety of black and brown children and their families.

While positive COVID-19 cases are increasing in our community daily and disparately affecting minority communities nationwide, Mayor Carlos Gimenez is moving towards opening Head Start programs throughout Miami-Dade County and exposing our youngest—possibly most vulnerable—students and families to harm. 
 
READ. SIGN. SHARE.

Tell Mayor Carlos Gimenez to put a stop to this madness while we can still protect the lives and safety of black and brown children and their families.
 
Responsible experts have called for a 14-day reduction in COVID-19 cases before reopening society, yet we are doing so in Miami-Dade County despite being the epicenter for the virus in Florida. Currently, we are seeing larger than ever increases in the number of people testing positive for COVID-19. 
 
Moreover, children have now started to fall sick and die even though they were initially thought to be immune to COVID-19. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have dubbed this condition "multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children."

 

United Teachers of Dade started this petition to Mayor Carlos A. Gimenez and  While positive COVID-19 cases are increasing in our community daily and disparately affecting minority communities nationwide, Mayor Carlos Gimenez is moving towards opening Head Start programs throughout Miami-Dade County and exposing our youngest—possibly most vulnerable—students and families to harm.
Tell Mayor Carlos Gimenez to put a stop to this madness while we can still protect the lives and safety of black and brown children and their families.

While positive COVID-19 cases are increasing in our community daily and disparately affecting minority communities nationwide, Mayor Carlos Gimenez is moving towards opening Head Start programs throughout Miami-Dade County and exposing our youngest—possibly most vulnerable—students and families to harm. 
 
READ. SIGN. SHARE.

Tell Mayor Carlos Gimenez to put a stop to this madness while we can still protect the lives and safety of black and brown children and their families.
 
Responsible experts have called for a 14-day reduction in COVID-19 cases before reopening society, yet we are doing so in Miami-Dade County despite being the epicenter for the virus in Florida. Currently, we are seeing larger than ever increases in the number of people testing positive for COVID-19. 
 
Moreover, children have now started to fall sick and die even though they were initially thought to be immune to COVID-19. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have dubbed this condition "multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children."

 

Miami-Dade Transit Union Launches 'Ride Not Die' Campaign Amid Corona Virus Pandemic

Miami-Dade Transit Union Launches 'Ride Not Die' Campaign Amid Corona Virus Pandemic

#RideNotDie Challenge
#RideNotDie Challenge
#RideNotDie Challenge
#RideNotDie Challenge
#RideNotDie Challenge
#RideNotDie Challenge

New Initiatives

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TWU 291 Board Members

Jeff Mitchell
Jeff MitchellTWU 291 President
Jeff Mitchell
Jeff MitchellTWU 291 President
Jeffery W. Mitchell, President

Transport Workers Union, Local 291
6355 N.W. 36th Street Suite 502
Virginia Gardens, FL. 33166.
Office:(305) 526-8077
Fax:305-526-8078
Cell: 786-586-7851
Website: www.twu291.org

Joseph D’Elia
Joseph D’EliaExecutive Vice-President
Joseph D’Elia
Joseph D’EliaExecutive Vice-President
Joseph D’Elia, Executive Vice-President

Transport Workers Union, Local 291
6355 N.W. 36th Street Suite 502
Virginia Gardens, FL. 33166
Office:(305) 526-8077
Fax:305-526-8078
Website: www.twu291.org

Cassandra Gilbert
Cassandra GilbertSecretory-Treøsurer
Cassandra Gilbert
Cassandra GilbertSecretory-Treøsurer
Cassandra Gilbert, Treasurer

TWU Local 291, AFL-CIO
6355 N.W. 36th Street Suite 502
Virginia Gardens, FL. 33166
(305) 624-1168 (Phone)
(305) 624-1254 (Fax)
Website:

Latonya Redmond
Latonya RedmondRecording Secretary
Latonya Redmond
Latonya RedmondRecording Secretary
Latonya Redmond, Recording Secretary

TWU Local 291, AFL-
6355 N.W. 36th Street Suite 502
Virginia Gardens, FL. 33166
USA
Email: redmondlatonva@gmail.com
Mobile: (786)246-1348

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See Full Board Of Executives

Contact Information, Bios Etc.

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TWU LOCAL 291ARTICLESNEWSVIEWSINTERVIEWSPODCASTINFORMATION CENTER

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TWU Local 291's home for showcasing TWU291 News, Views and Interviews from Transportation related sectors of our economy and industry. Watch, follow, be informed ... stay motivated.
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TWU Local 291's home for showcasing podcasts from Transportation related sectors of our economy and industry. You can listen to recent episodes of your favorite podcasts and find free audio stories that entertain, inform, and inspire.

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News, Views and Interviews Regarding Issues Of Interest To Our Local 291 Members

Transit union files lawsuit against Miami-Dade Transportation & Public Works director


Category: Covid-19

Coronavirus Impact: Miami-Dade Transportation Union Files Emergency Lawsuit To ‘Protect Its Workers’


Category: Covid-19

Miami-Dade transportation union involved in spat with transit head over COVID-19 safety measures


Category: Covid-19

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Why Unions Still Matter

Unions mean better pay, benefits, and working conditions for their members; they force employers to treat employees with dignity and respect; and at their best, they provide a way for workers to make society both more democratic and egalitarian.

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